Boot-Up Manager (BUM) – Graphical runlevel editor

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The scripts located in /etc/init.d are part of the bootup sequence of every Debian-like distro. Very often Ubuntu's documentation and guides have suggested -- in order to deactivate init scripts -- to change the permissions of the scripts in /etc/init.d, making them non-executable. This will have the following consequences:
* You'll get an error message at boot time (to avoid it you need to patch all the scripts);
* You are breaking the logical chain stated in debian-policy concerning runlevel configuration.

If the logic of a debian-like system boot up sequence is not very clear and familiar to you, you should not play with symlinks, permissions, etc. In order to avoid messing up your system, Boot-Up Manager will automate all of your configuration in a nice and clean graphical interface.

Boot-Up Manager is a Perl-Gtk2 application to handle runlevels configuration of any debian derivative system. With this program the user will easily start and stop boot-up scripts, without the necessity to handle thru complex links and permissions.

Boot-Up Manager has been developed and tested on Ubuntu, but as it only relies on Perl-Gtk2 libraries, it can be run on any Debian-like system.

Install Boot-Up Manager in ubuntu

Open the terminal and run the following command

sudo apt-get install bum

Using Boot-Up Manager (BUM)

You can open BUM from System--->Administration--->BootUP Manager

BUM is loading in progress

Once it opens you should see similar to the following screen

BUM Advanced options screen

Change start/stop Priority for one service

For more information check BUM documentation from here

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3 thoughts on “Boot-Up Manager (BUM) – Graphical runlevel editor

  1. Last time i checked (9.10) it wasn’t compatible with upstart and it messed up some things i could only restore manually by comparison with another machine.

    So unless it’s compatible with upstart i wouldn’t recommend it.

  2. An “essential” tool for quickly editing out (or in) the multiplicity of items the O.S. installs, but may not be necessary. Ex: Bluetooth. Every packaged distro I’ve installed puts in Bluetooth support, frequently as a daemon. I don’t have Bluetooth and do not envision EVER getting Bluetooth for my massive multi-core desktop. Laptop? Sure, but I’m not using a Laptop. Bluetooth is just one more piece of software wasting memory & drive-space and sucking up electrons.

    BUM allows you to start & stop, or enable & disable boot services at will. Handy.

    It is not in the Zesty repositories this moment, so why it’s listed in the title of this is peculiar. It is available in the Ubuntu “store,” but I generally use the repositories for my applications.

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