April 25, 2010 · General · Email This Post

This tutorial will explain How to change the boot splash screen (Plymouth's boot image, or color, behind the "Ubuntu...." logo from purple to whatever you would like) image for 10.04

Open the terminal and run the following commands

sudo cp /usr/share/applications/gnome-appearance-properties.desktop /usr/share/gdm/autostart/LoginWindow

Then logout, and you'll see an Appearance window pop up. Change it to how you prefer it, then close it and login as usual.

When you have logged in after finishing the customizing, run this command to prevent the Appearance window from opening at the GDM screen every time.

sudo unlink /usr/share/gdm/autostart/LoginWindow/gnome-appearance-properties.desktop

or

If you want to install plymouth themes run the following command from your terminal

sudo aptitude install plymouth-theme-*

Now you can run the following commands to change login and plymouth screens

sudo update-alternatives --config default.plymouth

gksu -u gdm dbus-launch gnome-appearance-properties

Sponsored Link

Incoming search terms:

Related posts

24 Comments to “How do you change login and plymouth image in ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx)”

  1. Can u guys show us how to do this not using the terminal.

    [Reply]

  2. Jerad says:

    @Waqar

    There isn’t any software out yet to do this without using the terminal. If you are adverse to doing it via this method, you will have to wait some time until someone else writes a GUI interface for the above commands.

    [Reply]

  3. Correct me if I am wrong but I think you need to add the following to realise the change of plymouth-theme:

    “sudo update-initramfs -u”

    Keep up the good work!

    Cheers from Sweden!

    [Reply]

  4. Carnegie0107 says:

    You can (sorta) do this without using the terminal. To change login screen preferences, you need to open Nautilus as root. Hit Alt+F2, and type ‘gksu nautilus’ (without the quotes) and hit enter. Enter your password when the window pops up asking for it, then navigate to usr/share/applications. Copy gnome-appearance-properties.desktop, then navigate to /usr/share/gdm/autostart/LoginWindow and paste it there. Then logout. Change your preferences. Log back in. Then Alt+F2, type ‘gksu nautilus’ again to get Nautilus as root again, go back to /usr/share/gdm/autostart/LoginWindow, and delete gnome-appearance-properties.desktop.

    It’s exactly the same thing as the terminal commands. The only difference is, the commands are way faster and easier. If you flat-out refuse to use the terminal, then you missed the point of GNU/Linux and should go buy a Mac. We don’t use the terminal all the time because we don’t have a GUI for things yet so we have to make do with commands… we use the terminal because commands work so much more efficiently than pointing and clicking ever could.

    [Reply]

  5. bxcrx says:

    Do any of these commands in the tutorial actually change the first purple screen while restarting/booting up when you see with the “Ubuntu” logo with the dots under it going from white to orange or vice versa.?

    If it does, then I have yet to be succesful when trying to change it.

    I’m not talking about the user Logon screen where you enter in the username and password.

    [Reply]

  6. @bxcrx: Have a look at my earlier post in this comment-thread which is missing (still, correct me someone if I am wrong).

    To sum it up, after having installed the plymouth-themes according to the instructions in the blog-post you choose which one to use from the menu presented to you by issuing this:

    “sudo update-alternatives –config default.plymouth”

    After that you need to perform the following to make the change take effect:

    “sudo update-initramfs -u”

    Cheers!

    [Reply]

  7. bxcrx says:

    So far I’ve been able to change the Plymouth boot theme to another theme(ubuntu studio), and the logon screen wallpaper to the one that matches my desktop wallpaper.

    I’m looking to edit either the default, or ubuntu studio theme so that I can put my wallpaper as the first image that I see throughout the whole boot process.

    I don’t care about the ubuntu logo’s in the plymouth themes I just want to change the background behind the ubuntu logo’s in the plymouth themes. Whether its the default plymouth theme that comes with 10.04 or the ubuntu studio theme.

    [Reply]

  8. Anton Stoychev says:

    Anyone else experiencing odd wallpaper tile over the stretched version ? (on the login screen)
    The only not buggy setup is when I apply plain colour.

    [Reply]

  9. John says:

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  10. Cammy says:

    I followed this, and when I got to the final command (gksu -u gdm dbus-launch gnome-appearance-properties) it totally blew away my desktop theme, and I’ve been trying to get it back for three days. Any info on how to “undo” this command would be REALLY helpful! Thanks.

    [Reply]

  11. aeon says:

    Have a look at my earlier post in this comment-thread which is missing (still, correct me someone if I am wrong).

    thanks thomastvivlarenDOTse

    To sum it up, after having installed the plymouth-themes according to the instructions in the blog-post you choose which one to use from the menu presented to you by issuing this:

    “sudo update-alternatives –config default.plymouth”

    After that you need to perform the following to make the change take effect:

    “sudo update-initramfs -u”

    after trying literally everything this worked for me

    [Reply]

  12. roadman1980 says:

    i had some problems, but with help it s done! thanks

    [Reply]

  13. anon says:

    @Cammy

    To remove the icon from the idicator applet hit
    alt-f2 and type “gnome-keyboard-properties”. Under accessibility uncheck the box that says accessibility features can be toggled with keyboard.

    To change the theme go to System > Preferences > Appearance and choose a new theme.

    [Reply]

  14. dave says:

    Hi thanks for the guide but just a question on the

    Appearance Preferences -> Background

    which contains the available images of choice..
    if i need to add my own set of background image to use, where should i put the image? it seems that it wont include it in the list if i add it during a regular session..once i log out the image that i have added wont be available..
    i also tried copying the image that i like to the /usr/share/backgrounds folder but it is still not available once i log out.

    thanks in advance

    [Reply]

  15. michael says:

    Easier yet is to use Ubuntu Tweak. This is a nice program that lets you customize many settings, including login background. Here is a link on how to install it.
    http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-install-ubuntu-tweak-in-ubuntu-10-04lucid-lynx.html

    [Reply]

  16. christophercules says:

    Doing this in Ubuntu 10.04.

    All I keep getting after typing the first code in the terminal is “cp: missing destination file operand after `/usr/share/applications/gnome-appearcne-properties.desktop/usr/share/gdm/autostart/LoginWindow’
    Try `cp –help’ for more information.”

    This is getting ridiculous… I can’t find anyone who can help me change the background for my Login Screen – why is this procedure so complicated?

    Having less customization doesn’t make Ubuntu 10.04 “lightweight,” it makes it fascist.

    [Reply]

  17. somejan says:

    @christophercules:
    There should be a space between …/gnome-appearance-properties.desktop and /usr/share/gdm/…

    [Reply]

  18. npascut1 says:

    Be very careful when editing your kernel image (i.e. with update-initramfs). You can do some damage if you have third-party drivers for your system that require kernel modules. I’ve been having some trouble with my Nvidia drivers since following the instructions above.

    [Reply]

  19. will says:

    Thank you, I got it. It is like call the “changing theme appearance” function in the loading page, which change the login screen as a result. It is so smart. Ha ha!

    [Reply]

  20. skey. says:

    thanks for that as others said keep up the good work

    [Reply]

  21. Davhec says:

    Check this video about Plymouth in Ubuntu 10.04

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITqxFvML6gQ

    [Reply]

  22. George M says:

    Thank you for this post. I’m fairly new at using Ubuntu, but I’m very happy with it so far. With the help of experienced users, like the ones on this site, I am enjoying some freedom from Windows.

    [Reply]

  23. Rojer says:

    This looks like a dangerous post. Like camic, running this -I was trying to get my picture to display at login- blew away my whole desktop theme. I had quite a lot of customization set and a lot giot removed and metacity window buttons (useful for people dual booting windows) got broken and won’t work anymore.

    I would edit the original post and add a warning + maybe some sort of instructions on undoing.

    Lesson learned : since ubuntu doesn’t come out of the box with a system restore feature, like windows has been doing for 10 years, people (including me) should be more careful about launching root command on their system. Maybe people should be a bit momre careful posting them :)

    [Reply]

    Vappy Reply:

    “since ubuntu doesn’t come out of the box with a system restore feature, like windows has been doing for 10 years”

    Actually it does. It’s nestled away in the bootloader just as Windows is. Read the manual.

    “people (including me) should be more careful about launching root command on their system”

    Well, you’re damn right about that! *YOU* would probably change a lightbulb while it’s still on and wonder why your fingers get burned.

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply