How to disable password prompts in Ubuntu

This tutorial will explain How to disable password prompts in Ubuntu

Note:- Disabling password prompts might be a security risk

Open the terminal window from Applications --> accessories --> terminal, run the command:

sudo visudo

Find the line that says

%admin ALL=(ALL) ALL

and change it to

%admin ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

Save and exit the file

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67 thoughts on “How to disable password prompts in Ubuntu

  1. OH DEAR GOD! ALL OF YOU!

    All this guy did… was tell how to do it. THAT IS ALL. Some people may not like the CONSTANT in-your-face prompts, and I could see why.

    On one of my desktops, I disabled this prompt because:

    a) I didn’t do to much heavy computing on it
    b) It’s slow and the prompts make it takethat much more time.

    I installed ubuntu onto it to get it working again. It’s running very well but when I’m adjusting visual effects or installing updates, the prompts get annoying as all hell.

    Good tip, thanks.

    [Reply]

  2. I use Linux as a virtual computer, so passwords are unnecessary in most cases. If something happens I’ll just re do it anyway

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  3. LOL. Ubuntu fanboys tell me how much Windows sucks because it’s unsecure, so I go to Ubuntu to see what all the hoopla is about, and then I discover that when I want Ubuntu to be as unannoying as Windows (those passwords prompts are annoying as hell – among other things), I learn that Ubuntu is just as danger prone as Windows.

    Anyways: thanks for the info on how to turn off the password deal. Sucks major butt monkey, and I’m not sorry to see it go.

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  4. Actually, it is still much more secure. There are virtually no virus or adware (or anything, for that matter) for Ubuntu. So its nearly impossible for something bad to happen.

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  5. I followed all the instructions above and I must say thanks for nothing cause it does not work i still have passwords everywhere! this is the reason Ubuntu is only on 1% of the worlds computers because it passwords ya to death! you need to get like windows and have ZERO passwords or at least a simple setting to turn the F’n things off!

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  6. Incorrect bob… Its because Linux does not have much when it comes to program support. You have a web browser. And Open Office…… Anddddd……… Lets see….. Thats it.

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    ptah Reply:

    It’s good that your type stay away from Linux.

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  7. For some reason the website didn’t take the special characters (like the double hifen and the 3 periods in one)

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  8. This is what I get –

    visudo: /etc/sudoers: Permission denied

    I really want to love this OS but really hate programming – it’s like learning DOS all over again. Or alternatively, the terminal asks for a password and and then won’t respond to the keyboard when I try to type it in. Surely we’ve gone beyond all this by now – how is anyone supposed to get any work done?

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    Ryan Reply:

    The password is being entered. However, it doesn’t display the ‘*’ character for each character in the password in case that guy over there or that camera above you are looking at your monitor. And they are. Watch out.

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  9. Excuse me, but how do I save after edit?

    I am a noob :$ :P

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    sfowler Reply:

    1) Ctrl+X
    2) Yes
    3) Enter (at the file name)

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  10. Thanks for the post.

    For jonz, Farid and anyone like myself who doesn’t like/know the vi interface, you can also type:

    sudo gedit /etc/sudoers

    To edit the file.

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  11. I edited it, but I was stuck for 20 minutes to understand how to save the file.
    It’s such a boring operating system that I’ll switch back to windows. Linux isn’t user friendly, especially when it comes to novice users.

    Sorry to say, but this really sucks. I like the performance, but I rather wait a little bit more instead of having to find out how to save the file.

    Thx anyway.

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  12. sorry guys but your methods doesn’t work

    for software center i found this

    cat <<EOT | sudo tee /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/allow-apt.pkla
    [allow-apt]
    Identity=unix-group:admin
    Action=org.debian.apt.*
    ResultAny=no
    ResultInactive=yes
    ResultActive=yes
    EOT

    now no password popup ! coooool !!!!

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  13. just copy this text with the mouse

    cat <<EOT | sudo tee /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/allow-apt.pkla
    [allow-apt]
    Identity=unix-group:admin
    Action=org.debian.apt.*
    ResultAny=no
    ResultInactive=yes
    ResultActive=yes
    EOT

    now open a terminal

    type:
    sudo su
    insert your password

    then right click over and click on paste

    now hit ENTER key on keyboard

    now restart your system

    now open ubuntu software center,look for some software and click on install..

    surprize:
    will not popup any password again

    thanks for all guys are writing in forums ideas … lol

    [Reply]

    mrdreamers Reply:

    is this 4 all password prompts? or just for software center??

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  14. Put it this way:

    If you’re using Ubuntu as a Home Theatre PC to stream LiveTV and watch movies, any administrative task you may need to do requires a password.

    Now I’m sitting on my sofa with an IR Remote. You tell me how it’s simple just to enter my password?

    Thanks for this, it makes my life a whole lot easier!

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  15. @CJ: In your case, you just need to give root privileges to some of the applications you use (via remote control) instead of putting your PC at risk! I mean, instead, you can edit the sudoers file to add some applications so that password wont be asked for if they are executed. That’s the best solution for your case.

    … and actually, this is somewhat similar to what the recent ubuntu update managed versions do! It updates the list without asking for a password, however, it does when installing. Let’s put installation aside, doesn’t apt-get update need root privileges to work? Then how come the update manager does that on your behalf? They have an exception.

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  16. me thanks that worked! Is there a tweak to eliminate passwords on Ubuntu Tweak? I manage 13 computers and get tired of constantly entering PWs

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  17. Finally! Disabled the freaking password prompt for everything i open! I mean i am more at the risk of letting others see my password (when i use my net-book outside) then my computer being attacked! Moreover, its just a net-book, so even if it gets the “non-existent” Linux virus, i can just format it and reinstall the OS! Freaking Linux fan-boys made it too idiotic and troublesome for regular users who just want to stay up to date, install their favorite softwares (from their own repositories) and just have root privileges!

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  18. This doesn’t work using xfce4 can you please post a method for xfce4? Thank you

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    CJ Reply:

    Worked using xfce4 when I tried

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  19. HELP!. wont get passed startup screen.
    Ubuntu 10 I used the command above. sudo visudo

    Find the line that says

    %admin ALL=(ALL) ALL

    and change it to

    %admin ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

    Like many I could not find save. So i just exited. I then restarted the cpomputer. Now it played the drums, and shows the Ubuntu loading screen but is just frozen there.

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  20. Linux (using Ubuntu) really isn’t complicated. Especially with all these ttorials. At least the current OS is very basic. I had been a Windows user and had no trouble switching to Ubuntu. Or maybe that is just because I am a programmer (but with very little expirience away from web programming…)

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  21. First of all some of these comments are hilarious! You guys (on both sides) need to relax, grab a cold beer, and say to yourselves “its just an operating system, no more, no less…” There is no reason to go all Bloods and Crips on each other.

    Now, I am definitely a Linux n00b. With the exception of some basic Unix commands I learned back in 1993-1994 when I was trying to hack into my schools “FreeNET” server (text-based internet, all we had in those days) this is all new to me. It’s certainly been “interesting” learning the ins and outs of a new OS, I have to say I really enjoy using Ubuntu. Everything is very well put together and streamlined once you understand how it functions. The one thing that does annoy me is the constant prompting for password authentication. It even seems like if I even try to move my mouse cursor or turn up the volume I’m prompted for my password. This is made even more annoying by the fact that I have the habit of selecting LOOOOONG and complex passwords for everything that I do. Now what I would like to do is leave my initial login password protected but remove the restrictions on things like updates, unlocking certain locked options in my apps, editing my software sources, and executing applications like Wireshark (which for some reason can’t access any interfaces unless I run as root, then gives me a stern lecture via prompt about the “dangers” of running it as root…wtf?) Now will the above method help me accomplish this or is there some other way to make this happen? Thanks to everybody for their suggestions and feedback…and some of you other lunatics may need to seek counseling :/

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  22. For a guy who use Windows all his life I amn testing 12.10 on Windows 8 through VMWARE, I can tell you the command doesn’t work. Any other bright ideas?

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  23. @Jack:

    I think they’ve added more restrictions through polkit in the last few versions. After being prompted for my very long and line-noise-esque password when I just wanted to change my time zone while traveling, I found this:

    sudo perl -i -pe ‘s/auth_admin_keep/yes/g’ /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/*.policy
    sudo perl -i -pe ‘s/auth_admin/yes/g’ /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/*.policy
    sudo perl -i -pe ‘s{no}{yes}g’ /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/*.policy

    If Ubuntu has a problem with people wiping all their carefully constructed policies away, they shouldn’t impose restrictions on doing something as simple as changing the time or pulling updates.

    Inevitably, someone will respond that these restrictions are in place because Linux is a multi-user OS, but I notice they haven’t removed the option to allow logins without a password, indicating they realize most desktop machines are single-user. Their move toward multi-user-hostile technologies like Wayland put the last nail in that coffin.

    The above commands are a blunt instrument. They worked fine on my 12.04 machines but who knows what’ll happen in the future. Use them at your own risk.

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  24. I’ve struggled with this password busniness (amongst other Linux basics) off and on for years also and have basically given up using my Linux computer as it’s so hard to find out how to do even the simplest things. Here we have several totally different solutions from different nice helpful people but none of them are any use to me as I can’t find anything called ‘Accessories’ or ‘Terminal’ or even ‘Applications’ and I don’t what a dash or a sudo is. You guys always assume a level of knowledge and experience which I don’t have to start with, so I don’t ever get to learn how to use this system :( Is there anywhere a genuine idiot’s guide which actually starts from where we are as newcomers used to the ease and functionality of Windows?

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    don bas Reply:

    Very good comment. And “roadsign” for uBuntu developers, and/or geeks. uBuntu and other Linux distros, became an important alternative to MS (Win)

    But using uBuntu is so complicated, that I am still keeping tying it in paralel to Win. Not USING. And tghe main goal of developers should be to make Lx possible to use as prime OS.

    One possibility is to build a network of volunteer geeks who will take “ON Duty” times so we the user can contact them anytime for anything.

    And one more thing about volunteering here or elswhere. We the users, should start building a new “culture” – to give a tip to any contact of the kind that halps us. Firsty, geeks should give their email, or can be this site email or similar, so I can send a $1 or more tip.

    [Reply]

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