February 27, 2009 · General · Email This Post

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PrefixSuffix is a GUI application that renames batches of files by changing the beginning or end of their names.

Install prefixsuffix in Ubuntu

sudo aptitude install prefixsuffix

This will complete the installation

Using prefixsuffix

If you want to open prefixsuffix goto Applications--->Accessories--->PrefixSuffix

Once it opens you should see similar to the following screen


In the above screen select your prefix or suffix and folder location click on rename files

Useful Tip

create a new bash-script with the following command line in your Nautilus scripts home (~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/)

#!/bin/sh
prefixsuffix $@

then save it to Rename.sh and chmod it to 700.

Now you can to batch rename from Nautilus at current prompt position.

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13 Comments to “PrefixSuffix – Gui application that renames batches of files in Ubuntu”

  1. Ben says:

    This is a scenario where a bash script is much more capable. Maybe you should post some useful batch renaming scripts…

    [Reply]

  2. Sciamano says:

    For the KDE environment, there is KRename which is a much more powerful renamer.

    [Reply]

  3. stam says:

    I use GPRename 2.5 [A complete batch renamer for files and directories.] which is quite good actually…

    [Reply]

  4. Thomas says:

    Don’t forget the rename command. Perl-based, regexp support, very flexible and powerful.

    From the mangape:

    For example, to rename all files matching “*.bak” to strip the extension, you might say

    rename ‘s/\.bak$//’ *.bak

    To translate uppercase names to lower, you’d use

    rename ‘y/A-Z/a-z/’ *

    [Reply]

  5. crjackson says:

    I’m trying to figure out how to wildcard rename the prefix. I want to rename everything in the directory with the person’s (they’re pictures) first name possibly followed by a number.

    Is there a wildcard that will work with this application?

    [Reply]

  6. N3storm says:

    Nice app, more of this easy-to-use needed for common tasks in every day computing. Thanks for pointing it out.

    [Reply]

  7. woohoo says:

    I also use KRename, but on Gnome, it works very well.

    [Reply]

  8. rakesh says:

    I am impressed by the use of bash by thomas, the bash constructs are very powerful and simple, but its made useless by using it less,

    Though i appreiate the effort for making a GUI application, i just needed to highlight the usage of bash, The comment have no offence towards the GUI application

    [Reply]

  9. StickHutzee says:

    With bash:

    for a in *oldsuffix; do mv $a ${a%oldsuffix}newsuffix; done

    and you can use “#” (instead of “%”) for prefix substitution.

    With zsh it’s more readable: mv $a ${a:s/oldsuffix/newsuffix}

    But what beats them all is Emacs dired write mode (wdired-change-to-wdired-mode)… (^__^)

    [Reply]

  10. papukai says:

    Metamorphose is much more advanced than prefixsuffix.

    [Reply]

  11. Binny V A says:

    I would recommend using KRename for doing this. Yes, its a KDE app – but it has a lot more options when compared to this.

    [Reply]

  12. sandeep das says:

    metmorphose its avery improved and very advance thanprefixsuffix

    [Reply]

  13. Mossby says:

    KRename is great. But if you’re on Gnome, you’re gonna have to install 267MB of KDE stuff to run it. (Unless you’ve previously installed a KDE program) Not too big a deal these days, but a fair warning.

    [Reply]

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