September 23, 2010 · General, Monitoring · 3 comments

downtimed is a program for monitoring operating system downtime, uptime, shutdowns and crashes and for keeping record of such events.

downtimed is a daemon process which is intended to be started automatically from system boot scripts every time when the operating system of a server starts. First the daemon logs its findings about the previous downtime to a specified logging destination as well as in a database file which can be displayed with downtimes command.
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September 2, 2010 · Monitoring · 2 comments

How you can monitor your server and performs usage? With Bijk you get online 30 graphs about Load, CPU, memory, traffic, Apache, PostreSQL and others with Alerts. Bijk can be used on Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, RedHat and with Cloud providers. Continue reading →

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August 18, 2010 · Monitoring · 4 comments

NetHogs is a small ‘net top' tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. If there's suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this. This makes it easy to indentify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth.
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June 7, 2010 · Monitoring, Server · 3 comments

Octopussy is a solution to manage your logs (also frequently called a SIM/SEM/SIEM Solution). Basically, it stores your logs, produces reports, and raises alerts.
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December 25, 2009 · Monitoring, Server · 6 comments


Logwatch is a modular log analyser that runs every night and mails you the results. It can also be run from command line.The output is by service and you can limit the output to one particular service. The subscripts which are responsible for the output, mostly convert the raw log lines in structured format.
Logwatch generally ignores the time component in the output, that means, you will know that the reported event was logged in the requested range of time, but you will have to go to the raw log files to get the exact details.

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