October 18, 2011 · General · Email This Post

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ClassicMenu Indicator is a notification area applet (application indicator) for the top panel of Ubuntu’s Unity desktop environment. It provides a simple way to get a classic GNOME-style application menu for those who prefer this over the Unity dash menu. Like the classic GNOME menu, it includes Wine games and applications if you have those installed.

Install ClassicMenu Indicator on ubuntu 11.10

Open the terminal and run the following commands

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:diesch/testing
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install classicmenu-indicator

Screenshot

 

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9 Comments to “How to install ClassicMenu Indicator on ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot)”

  1. buddy says:

    nice! can you move it to the left end from the panel panel?

    [Reply]

  2. Mychal says:

    Did you install two classic menu indicators? Cos there’s two icons in there

    [Reply]

  3. gh44gh55 says:

    will the dash still be there ?

    [Reply]

  4. Josh says:

    Thank you for pointing me to this. I now consider the Unity Interface much more usable. With this it seems If able I could ditch the Dash altogether and the side menu and utilize AWN or DockbarX for a nicer effect.

    [Reply]

    Cyrano Reply:

    Sooo you pretty much mean if unity were anything like gnome 2 it would actually be usable?

    [Reply]

    johnb0647 Reply:

    What I’m saying is that >>I PERSONALLY<>I personally<>may<< be better tablets, smart phones and in general for people whose computer use involves intensive use of a relatively small number of applications and for people for whom the computer is primarily entertainment and for whom "eye candy" is everything.

    I submit that there are a significant number of knowledge, scientific, engineering, programmer and other users for whom the Unity approach is not that great and it would have been very considerate of the Ubuntu people to recognize this and leave a quick and easy route to a menu tree structure for people who need it.

    I understand where Shuttleworth is coming from. Profits are hard to come by in the desktop hardware market today while margins for the new tablet and smart phone toys approach "the good old days". Thus Microsoft and the other biggies are migrating the look and feel of their software toward the direction where the most money can be found. Unlike some, I don't think that means that the desktop is doomed. There will always be people who need big and/or multiple screens, keyboards (until voice recognition is just as functional) bit pads, etc.

    Just my opinion.

    Sorry to be so wordy and please don't anyone interpret the preceeding as a flame. It's just an opinion.

    [Reply]

    johnb0647 Reply:

    Let me try this again since I apparently buried some control characters in my first reply which caused some of it to disappear. I hope the moderators will purge my previous truncated reply.

    What I’m saying is that I PERSONALLY use more than four hundred programs and I don’t always remember the names. In addition some apps from the USC have “icon names” different from their file names, i.e. “archive manager” is actually “file roller” and “file manager” is actually “nautilus”.

    So I PERSONALLY am much more productive if I can organise my programs in a tree menu by function.

    I also confess a lifelong hate of icons. I learned to read long ago and I can always find things faster in an alphabetical list than in a random grid of icons.

    I’m happy to concede that Unity may be better for tablets, smart phones and in general for people whose computer use involves intensive use of a relatively small number of apps and for people for whom the computer is primarily entertainment and “eye candy” is everything.

    However I submit that there are a significant number of knowledge, scientific, engineering, programmer and other users for whom the Unity approach is not that great and it would have been very considerate of the Ubuntu people to recognize this and leave a quick and easy route to a menu tree structure for people who need it.

    I understand where Shuttleworth is coming from. Profits are hard to come by in the desktop market today while margins for the new tablet and smart phone toys approach “the good old days”. Thus Microsoft, etc. are migrating the look and feel of their software toward the direction where the most money can be found. Unlike some, I don’t think that means that the desktop is doomed. There will always be people who need big and/or multiple screens, keyboards (until voice recognition is just as functional) bit pads, etc.

    Just my opinion.

    Sorry to be so wordy and please don’t interpret the preceeding as flaming. It’s just an opinion.

    [Reply]

  5. johnb0647 says:

    With this, Unity becomes usable.

    This should have been item #1 on the launcher by default. It could be removed with two clicks by anyone ready and willing to completely adopt the unity paradigm. With the exception of silly “eye candy” issues, this would have probably removed 75% of the complaints about Unity that I’ve seen to date.

    [Reply]

  6. Phill says:

    Agreed – a simple way to turn this on (or have it on the launcher) – a simpler way to turn OFF damn auto hide – and a simple way to turn off global menu’s and they make a system that you CAN multi task on and also find stuff you dont know about….

    000′s of times more user friendly…. point is for your average user – ubuntu is NOW not useable

    [Reply]

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