February 5, 2007 · Networking · Email This Post

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The basics for any network based on *nix hosts is the Transport Control Protocol/ Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) combination of three protocols. This combination consists of the Internet Protocol (IP),Transport Control Protocol (TCP), and Universal Datagram Protocol (UDP).

By Default most of the users configure their network card during the installation of Ubuntu. You can however, use the ifconfig command at the shell prompt or Ubuntu's graphical network configuration tools, such as network-admin, to edit your system's network device information or to add or remove network devices on your system

Configure Network Interface Using Command-Line

You can configure a network interface from the command line using the networking utilities. You configure your network client hosts with the command line by using commands to change your current settings or by editing a number of system files.

Configuring DHCP address for your network card

If you want to configure DHCP address you need to edit the /etc/network/interfaces and you need to enter the following lines replace eth0 with your network interface card

sudo vi /etc/network/interfaces

Note :- Use vi editor if you don't have GUI installed

If you have GUI use the following command

gksudo gedit /etc/network/interfaces

# The primary network interface -- use DHCP to find our address
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp

Configuring Static IP address for your network card

If you want to configure Static IP address you need to edit the /etc/network/interfaces and you need to enter the following lines replace eth0 with your network interface card

sudo vi /etc/network/interfaces

Note :- Use vi editor if you don't have GUI installed

If you have GUI use the following command

gksudo gedit /etc/network/interfaces

# The primary network interface

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.3.90
gateway 192.168.3.1
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.3.0
broadcast 192.168.3.255

After entering all the details you need to restart networking services using the following command

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

Setting up Second IP address or Virtual IP address in Ubuntu

If you are a server system administrator or normal user some time you need to assign a second ipaddress to your Ubuntu machine.For this you need to edit the /etc/network/interfaces file and you need to add the following syntax.Below one is the only example you need to chnage according to your ip address settings

sudo vi /etc/network/interfaces

Note :- Use vi editor if you don't have GUI installed

If you have GUI use the following command

gksudo gedit /etc/network/interfaces

auto eth0:1
iface eth0:1 inet static
address 192.168.1.60
netmask 255.255.255.0
network x.x.x.x
broadcast x.x.x.x
gateway x.x.x.x

You need to enter all the details like address,netmask,network,broadcast and gateways values after entering all the values save this file and you need to restart networking services in debian using the following command to take effect of our new ipaddress.

After entering all the details you need to restart networking services using the following command

sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart

Setting your ubuntu stytem hostname

Setting up your hostname upon a ubuntu installation is very straightforward. You can directly query, or set, the hostname with the hostname command.

As an user you can see your current hostname with

sudo /bin/hostname

Example

To set the hostname directly you can become root and run

sudo /bin/hostname newname

When your system boots it will automatically read the hostname from the file /etc/hostname

If you want to know more about how to setup host name check here

Setting up DNS

When it comes to DNS setup Ubuntu doesn't differ from other distributions. You can add hostname and IP addresses to the file /etc/hosts for static lookups.

To cause your machine to consult with a particular server for name lookups you simply add their addresses to /etc/resolv.conf.

For example a machine which should perform lookups from the DNS server at IP address 192.168.3.2 would have a resolv.conf file looking like this

sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf

Note :- Use vi editor if you don't have GUI installed

If you have GUI use the following command

gksudo gedit /etc/resolv.conf

enter the following details

search test.com
nameserver 192.168.3.2

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138 Comments to “Ubuntu Networking Configuration Using Command Line”

  1. khiz says:

    @ rduke15
    you have no idea how much you helped by the gedit instead of vi tip.
    thanks a lot

    [Reply]

  2. Zen of Linux says:

    Or replace vi with nano, for everyone coming from windows, the simple and intuitive nano editor is a heaven sent…!

    [Reply]

  3. Ian says:

    Hey, could you post the default loopback part of the network config?

    I deleted it accidentily and am unsure how to get it back. It was simply two lines of code something like

    auto lo inet an_ip_maybe?
    iface lo something something

    Much appreciated. Thanks

    [Reply]

  4. Joe says:

    # The loopback network interface
    auto lo
    iface lo inet loopback

    [Reply]

  5. syahril says:

    any one know,how to set load balancing in linux?

    [Reply]

  6. Josh says:

    I’m trying to add a second nic without re-install, need it to use heartbeat, I have latest lucid server that was an upgrade from 9.10..does not detect the nic though..any help appreciated!

    [Reply]

  7. Bizax says:

    Thanks. This tutorial very good.

    [Reply]

  8. dev says:

    i have a lap and dekstop. both ubuntu 9.10. how to share files? i have cross crimbed network cable. any help in this matter?

    [Reply]

  9. hsain says:

    i just try ubuntu 9.10 server. i want to know
    1. How do i know that the lan card is installed?
    2. if there are more than one lan card, how do i now the interface number of the cards?

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Run the following command from your terminal and see the output

    ifconfig

    [Reply]

  10. hsain says:

    as far as i know ifconfig doesn’t inform the type of lan card.
    if i have 3 lan cards, i need to know which one is eth0, eth1, and eth3.

    [Reply]

  11. khali says:

    Thanks. Useful help for me>

    [Reply]

  12. jack says:

    Once you add the two lines of code, how do you save?

    [Reply]

    jsp Reply:

    Its simple to save any file ,just press Esc key and type:wq

    [Reply]

  13. Josh says:

    I think it would be the esc key then shift :w to write, then esc shift :q! to exit out? using vi.

    [Reply]

  14. Josh says:

    jus smak me if im wrong..lol

    [Reply]

  15. Josh says:

    p.s.
    for go..sake, backup the orig!

    [Reply]

  16. Mehdi says:

    Jack;

    If you have pico (or nano) you can edit and then save by Ctrl X (to exit) then press Y for yes.
    if you are using vi (which I know very little about) do as Josh said above. Also you can do shift ZZ to exit vi.
    as already said, good idea to save a copy first. like
    cp file.1 file.2
    then
    pico file.1
    if anyone else knows of another cool editor let us know please.(I assume that ppl are using command line or terminal & not GUI or X).

    [Reply]

  17. Biswajit says:

    this is good but i tried same like this but my network is not configured.ip address cant accept it.help me

    [Reply]

  18. Mehdi says:

    Biswajit;

    are you using wireless or wired network?

    has linux found your network card?

    are you using xwindows or command line?

    do you have access to your router/dhcp server (is this at home or at work)?

    did you run the ifconfig -a and see what it says?

    [Reply]

  19. ieee488 says:

    +1 to rduke15 for point out the insanity of using vi instead of the much simpler gedit to edit /etc/network/interfaces file.

    unless you installed Ubuntu to not use X graphical interface, there is no reason to use vi.

    USE gedit

    [Reply]

  20. Orphis says:

    Thanks to Joe for publishing the default loopback interface, sorry for the late thanks.

    And to ieee488, the poster actually says ‘Note :- Use vi editor if you don’t have GUI installed;’

    So your statement is rendered pointless.

    [Reply]

  21. Susanta Roy says:

    To Check How many Network Interface Cards Install, execute the following command,

    susanta@admin:~$ ifconfig

    Note: if numbers of network card installed then it recognized as eth0, eth1, eth2, . . . in Linux

    [Reply]

  22. rex says:

    nice tuts!!! now i have alias ;)

    [Reply]

  23. Arnaud says:

    Now that we have two “interfaces” and two ip.
    How can we force a program to use only one interface ?

    I can set QoS and operational time on my router per IP. So, for example, I can define low bandwidth during the day for that specific IP in my LAN.

    I would like to force a specific program to use only one IP and all other applications use the the other one.

    Thanks

    ps vi is extremely efficient and fast compared to gedit. I admit that you have to get use to it.

    [Reply]

  24. Praveen says:

    Ubuntu is cool ;) Very nice collection of Terminal commands :)

    [Reply]

  25. benson says:

    am new in ubuntu server, pliz help me with configuration comands

    [Reply]

  26. ast says:

    nano is a good editor and is built in ubuntu too. it also has command helpers on the bottom.

    I want to ask if how to detect/configure the NIC if I installed ubuntu on a virtual machine? I set up Bridged Adapter and/or Host-only adapter but still does not show up when I type ‘ifconfig’.
    I also modified the /etc/network/interfaces file.

    [Reply]

  27. Amit says:

    I am trying to configure my ubuntu machine as a firewall. It has two NICs, one for internet (eth0) and other for LAN (eth1). I connected internet cable to etho and my laptop to eth1 using crossover cable.

    I am able to access ubuntu machine from laptop but unable to access internet. I user iptables to forward traffic from eth1 to eth0. But it is not working.
    Please suggest.

    [Reply]

    ramakrishna Reply:

    mr amit first u can disable firewall and also disable ipv6 then after u can access internet

    [Reply]

  28. mvz david says:

    i have a missing cd od wireless pci
    adapter anyone knows how to find the software?
    it says 300mbps but it doesnt go up to 300mbps

    [Reply]

  29. Deepak says:

    After restart all IP setting are flushing.

    Pls help me..

    [Reply]

  30. markpupugee says:

    how to configure dual lan in UBUNTU ??

    [Reply]

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